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Citizen CL-S400DT Energy Efficient Thermal Label Printer (Grey)

1000835
203 dpi, 6 ips, 4,1" print width, 5" media roll, Fan fold & Rolled media, Direct thermal, LCD control panel
Excl. Tax: £252.73 Incl. Tax: £303.28

The CL-S400DT is designed to provide simple, cost-effective, high quality label printing on a range of media, making it particularly suitable for producing boarding passes, swing tags, festival and concert tickets. Meanwhile, the ENERGY STAR® rating of the CL-S400DT printer ensures that your printing process is always energy efficient and eco-friendly.

  • Sleep and standby functions for energy efficiency
  • Can accommodate extra size and thickness fanfold card paper media.
  • Print speeds of up to six inches per second.

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Connectivity

802.11 b/g

802.11 b 

The 802.11b standard has a maximum raw data rate of 11 Mbit/s, and uses the same media access method defined in the original standard. 802.11b products appeared on the market in early 2000, since 802.11b is a direct extension of the modulation technique defined in the original standard. The dramatic increase in throughput of 802.11b (compared to the original standard) along with simultaneous substantial price reductions led to the rapid acceptance of 802.11b as the definitive wireless LAN technology. Devices using 802.11b experience interference from other products operating in the 2.4 GHz band. Devices operating in the 2.4 GHz range include microwave ovens, Bluetooth devices, baby monitors, cordless telephones, and some amateur radio equipment.

802.11 g 

In June 2003, a third modulation standard was ratified: 802.11g. This works in the 2.4 GHz band (like 802.11b), but uses the same OFDM based transmission scheme as 802.11a. It operates at a maximum physical layer bit rate of 54 Mbit/s exclusive of forward error correction codes, or about 22 Mbit/s average throughput.802.11g hardware is fully backward compatible with 802.11b hardware, and therefore is encumbered with legacy issues that reduce throughput by ~21% when compared to 802.11a. The then-proposed 802.11g standard was rapidly adopted in the market starting in January 2003, well before ratification, due to the desire for higher data rates as well as to reductions in manufacturing costs. By summer 2003, most dual-band 802.11a/b products became dual-band/tri-mode, supporting a and b/g in a single mobile adapter card or access point. Details of making b and g work well together occupied much of the lingering technical process; in an 802.11g network, however, activity of an 802.11b participant will reduce the data rate of the overall 802.11g network.Like 802.11b, 802.11g devices suffer interference from other products operating in the 2.4 GHz band, for example wireless keyboard

Ethernet

Ethernet stations communicate by sending each other data packets: blocks of data individually sent and delivered. As with other IEEE 802 LANs, each Ethernet station is given a 48-bit MAC address. The MAC addresses are used to specify both the destination and the source of each data packet. Ethernet establishes link level connections, which can be defined using both the destination and source addresses. On reception of a transmission, the receiver uses the destination address to determine whether the transmission is relevant to the station or should be ignored. Network interfaces normally do not accept packets addressed to other Ethernet stations.

Parallel Port

A parallel port is a type of interface found on computers (personal and otherwise) for connecting peripherals. In computing, a parallel port is a parallel communication physical interface. It is also known as a printer port or Centronics port. It was an industry de facto standard for many years, and was finally standardized as IEEE 1284 in the late 1990s, which defined the Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP) and Extended Capability Port (ECP) bi-directional versions. Today, the parallel port interface is seeing decreasing use because of the rise of Universal Serial Bus (USB) devices, along with network printing using Ethernet. The parallel port interface was originally known as the Parallel Printer Adapter on IBM PC-compatible computers. It was primarily designed to operate a line printer that used IBM's 8-bit extended ASCII character set to print text, but could also be used to adapt other peripherals. Graphical printers, along with a host of other devices, have been designed to communicate with the system.

dpi

203 DPI

Barcode printing in 203 DPI is great for text, numbers, and codes, but may appear a bit grainy or pixelated. You can improve the print quality of a barcode printed in 200 DPI by making the barcode physically larger on your label, but you may not have enough space to do this on your label. If you decide to do this, please note that each barcode must be scaled proportionately, since the aspect ratio of each barcode is strictly defined by each barcode symbology.203 DPI Printers are the fastest barcode printers and are suitable for high volume applications. 

Printing Method

Direct Thermal

Direct thermal printing requires a heat sensitive label material. The print head elements come into direct contact with the heat sensitive material where the heat from the elements causes a color change in the material to create the printed image. If an organisation is only going to print direct thermal, there are printers available that only have direct thermal capability. These printers are generally less costly to purchase because they do not contain any of the hardware necessary for driving and controlling ribbon. Eliminating the ribbon and ribbon hardware components also results in a less complex printer with fewer parts to wear and/or break, resulting in lower service costs and less downtime over the life of the printer.