• Home
  • Zebra MC9300 Handheld Android Mobile Computer

Price Match & Bulk Order Discounts Available +44 (0) 1249 434 992 Request a Callback

Filter Results Below:

Zebra MC9300 - 2D Long Range Imager SE4850, 53 Stnd Key, Android GMS, RoW

MC930B-GSEDG4RW
Gun, 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth, 2D Long Range Imager SE4850, 4.3inch display, 53 Stnd Key, 7000MAH Battery, Android GMS, 4GB RAM/32GB FLASH, Rest of World
Excl. Tax: £1,659.92 Incl. Tax: £1,991.90

Zebra MC9300 - 2D Imager SE4750, 53 Key 5250 Emulation, Android GMS, RoW

MC930B-GSCGG4RW
Gun, 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth, 2D Imager SE4750, 4.3inch display, 53 Key 5250 Emulation, 7000MAH Battery, Android GMS, 4GB RAM/32GB FLASH, Rest of World
Excl. Tax: £1,556.01 Incl. Tax: £1,867.21

Zebra MC9300 - 2D Long Range Imager SE4850, 53 Key 5250 Emulation, Android GMS, RoW

MC930B-GSEGG4RW
Gun, 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth, 2D Long Range Imager SE4850, 4.3inch display, 53 Key 5250 Emulation, 7000MAH Battery, Android GMS, 4GB RAM/32GB FLASH, Rest of World
Excl. Tax: £1,659.92 Incl. Tax: £1,991.90

Every day, over three million workers use an MC9000 Series mobile computer to streamline processes in warehouses and manufacturing plants all over the world. But now you need to handle and ship more orders every day, faster than ever. Introducing the mobile computer that can get it done, the MC9300 — the next evolution of the world's best-selling and most trusted enterprise mobile computer. Your workers get the ultimate in simplicity with Android, an operating system your workers already know well, a larger advanced touch display and more. Handle all of your applications with the ultimate in processing power and memory. New data capture capabilities include optional front and back cameras, extraordinary scan ranges and superior direct part mark (DPM) capture. The new battery runs twice as long as the MC9200 on a single charge. It’s the most rugged MC9000 Series ever created, ready to outlast virtually every device in its class in any environment — including the freezer. New Mobility DNA solutions make device, OS security and battery management easy, while delivering better-than-ever robust wireless connections. And since you can run your existing TE apps right out of the box, migrating to Android couldn't be easier.

Write Your Own Review of Zebra MC9300 Handheld Android Mobile Computer

How do you rate this product? *

Service
Performance
Value

keypad

Alphanumeric Keypad

A mobile device including: a display for displaying information; a processor for controlling software and firmware operation; a keypad for entering data to the processor comprising an array of alpha keys for alpha data entry and an array of numeric keys for numeric data entry, wherein entry of alpha data does not require use of numeric keys and numeric data does not require use of alpha keys, the keypad comprising: a first cell of alpha keys to be actuated by the left thumb of an operator, the first cell of alpha keys comprised of more than one essentially linear row of alpha keys; a second cell of alpha keys to be actuated by the right thumb of an operator, the second cell of alpha keys comprised of more than one essentially linear row of alpha keys.

Touchscreen

 A touchscreen is an input device normally layered on the top of an electronic visual display of an information processing system. A user can give input or control the information processing system through simple or multi-touch gestures by touching the screen with a special stylus/pen and-or one or more fingers. Some touchscreens use ordinary or specially coated gloves to work while others use a special stylus/pen only. The user can use the touchscreen to react to what is displayed and to control how it is displayed; for example, zooming to increase the text size.

Connectivity

802.11 a/b/g/n/ac

802.11 a

The 802.11a standard uses the same data link layer protocol and frame format as the original standard, but an OFDM based air interface (physical layer). It operates in the 5 GHz band with a maximum net data rate of 54 Mbit/s, plus error correction code, which yields realistic net achievable throughput in the mid-20 Mbit/s. Since the 2.4 GHz band is heavily used to the point of being crowded, using the relatively unused 5 GHz band gives 802.11a a significant advantage. However, this high carrier frequency also brings a disadvantage: the effective overall range of 802.11a is less than that of 802.11b/g. In theory, 802.11a signals are absorbed more readily by walls and other solid objects in their path due to their smaller wavelength, and, as a result, cannot penetrate as far as those of 802.11b. In practice, 802.11b typically has a higher range at low speeds (802.11b will reduce speed to 5.5 Mbit/s or even 1 Mbit/s at low signal strengths). 802.11a also suffers from interference, but locally there may be fewer signals to interfere with, resulting in less interference and better throughput.

802.11 b 

The 802.11b standard has a maximum raw data rate of 11 Mbit/s, and uses the same media access method defined in the original standard. 802.11b products appeared on the market in early 2000, since 802.11b is a direct extension of the modulation technique defined in the original standard. The dramatic increase in throughput of 802.11b (compared to the original standard) along with simultaneous substantial price reductions led to the rapid acceptance of 802.11b as the definitive wireless LAN technology. Devices using 802.11b experience interference from other products operating in the 2.4 GHz band. Devices operating in the 2.4 GHz range include microwave ovens, Bluetooth devices, baby monitors, cordless telephones, and some amateur radio equipment.

802.11 g 

In June 2003, a third modulation standard was ratified: 802.11g. This works in the 2.4 GHz band (like 802.11b), but uses the same OFDM based transmission scheme as 802.11a. It operates at a maximum physical layer bit rate of 54 Mbit/s exclusive of forward error correction codes, or about 22 Mbit/s average throughput.802.11g hardware is fully backward compatible with 802.11b hardware, and therefore is encumbered with legacy issues that reduce throughput by ~21% when compared to 802.11a. The then-proposed 802.11g standard was rapidly adopted in the market starting in January 2003, well before ratification, due to the desire for higher data rates as well as to reductions in manufacturing costs. By summer 2003, most dual-band 802.11a/b products became dual-band/tri-mode, supporting a and b/g in a single mobile adapter card or access point. Details of making b and g work well together occupied much of the lingering technical process; in an 802.11g network, however, activity of an 802.11b participant will reduce the data rate of the overall 802.11g network.Like 802.11b, 802.11g devices suffer interference from other products operating in the 2.4 GHz band, for example wireless keyboard

802.11 n 

802.11n is an amendment that improves upon the previous 802.11 standards by adding multiple-input multiple-output antennas (MIMO). 802.11n operates on both the 2.4 GHz and the lesser-used 5 GHz bands. Support for 5 GHz bands is optional. It operates at a maximum net data rate from 54 Mbit/s to 600 Mbit/s. The IEEE has approved the amendment, and it was published in October 2009 Prior to the final ratification, enterprises were already migrating to 802.11n networks based on the Wi-Fi Alliance's certification of products conforming to a 2007 draft of the 802.11n proposal. The 802.11n amendment includes many enhancements that improve WLAN range, reliability, and throughput. At the physical (PHY) layer, advanced signal processing and modulation techniques have been added to exploit multiple antennas and wider channels. At the Media Access Control (MAC) layer, protocol extensions make more efficient use of available bandwidth. Together, these High Throughput (HT) enhancements can boost data rates up to 600 Mbps – more than a ten-fold improvement over 54 Mbps 802.11a/g (now considered to be legacy devices).

802.11 ac

EEE 802.11ac-2013 is an amendment to IEEE 802.11, published in December 2013, that builds on 802.11n.Changes compared to 802.11n include wider channels (80 or 160 MHz versus 40 MHz) in the 5 GHz band, more spatial streams (up to eight versus four), higher-order modulation (up to 256-QAM vs. 64-QAM), and the addition of Multi-user MIMO (MU-MIMO). As of October 2013, high-end implementations support 80 MHz channels, three spatial streams, and 256-QAM, yielding a data rate of up to 433.3 Mbit/s per spatial stream, 1300 Mbit/s total, in 80 MHz channels in the 5 GHz band. Vendors have announced plans to release so-called "Wave 2" devices with support for 160 MHz channels, four spatial streams, and MU-MIMO in 2014 and 2015. 802.11ac is a set of physical layer enhancements for higher throughput in the 5-GHz band, chiefly with video in mind, and to achieve this it extends the techniques pioneered in 802.11n: more antennas, wider channels and more spatial streams, along with a number of new features to boost throughput and reliability. 802.11ac can be considered the next step after 802.11n, along the path running from 11b, to 11a/g, then 11n, and now 802.11ac. and it is likely to be introduced along with related amendments to 802.11 including video-related improvements in 802.11aa (video transport streams) and 802.11ad (very high throughput, short-range at 60 ghz). 

Operating System

Battery

Extended Capacity battery

Extended Capacity battery

Scanner

Image Scanner Standard Range

In addition to 1D barcodes, digital imagers (also known as area imagers) can decode 2D barcodes. 2D barcodes can be encoded with significantly more information than 1D barcodes, making digital imagers beneficial to transportation, logistics, and tracking applications. Area imagers enable omni-directional reading of barcodes, eliminating the need to accommodate the scanning device. In addition to reading one and two-dimensional barcodes, high performance digital imagers can capture and transfer images, enabling signature capture and the scanning of documents. Area imagers have the capability of reading Direct Part Marking (DPM), a method of permanently marking a product. DPM is growing in popularity and allows a product to be tracked throughout its life. Digital imagers offer many advantages in certain applications, but area imagers are not to be confused with linear imagers. Although data is captured in a similar way, linear imagers aren’t capable of decoding entire images or 2D barcodes as an area imager can. Area imagers offer significantly more benefits and are the only choice for 2D barcode applications.